What are some similarities between Hofstede’s culture dimensions and the 7d cultural dimensions? Which of the 7d cultural dimensions are unique compared to Hofstede’s model?

Response submitted by Jorge & Habib:

Hofstede’s model of national culture is based on differences in values and beliefs regarding work goals. The 7d cultural model is based on beliefs regarding how people relate to each other, how people manage time and how people deal with nature.

Hofstede’s culture dimensions and the 7d model include Individualism and Collectivism values. Individualism is the relationship between the individual and the group in society; and Collectivism is a set of cultural values that views people largely through the groups to which they belong. In collectivist societies people are defined by their group memberships including family, organization, and community. In individualistic societies, people are trained from childhood to be independent, and each person assumes individual responsibility for success or failure.

Although the 7d view of individualism is similar to Hofstede’s in its concept, the rankings of countries do not match exactly. One explanation for this difference may be that Trompenaars’ ranking comes from more recent data. Another reason is that the 7d model uses a different methodology from Hofstede’s model and captures subtle aspects of the individualism-collectivism range.

Both models also include orientations on how a culture manages time. Hofstede’s long-term orientation is a basic orientation toward time that values patience. The 7d model describes a time orientation society based on the past, present, or future or some combination of the three.

The 7d culture dimension that is unique is the “Control of” versus “accommodation with” nature: nature viewed as something to be controlled versus something to be accepted.

Heidi's response

What are some similarities between Hofstede’s culture dimensions and the 7d cultural dimensions?
Which of the 7d cultural dimensions are unique compared to Hofstede’s model?
Hofstede’s Model of National Culture describes five dimensions of basic cultural values.
  1. Power distance: expectations regarding equality among people.
  2. Uncertainty avoidance: typical reactions to situations considered different and dangerous.
  3. Individualism/Collectivism: the relationship between the individual and the group in society.
  4. Masculinity: expectations regarding gender roles.
  5. Long-term orientation: a basic orientation toward time.
7d Cultural Dimensions Model:
Five dimensions deal with relationships among people
1.
Universalism vs. particularism: the choice of dealing with other people based on rules or based on personal relationships. Do we consider rules or relationships more important:
2. Collectivism vs. individualism: Do we act mostly as individuals or as groups? In collectivist societies people are defined by their group memberships including family, organization, and community. Responsibility, achievement, and rewards are often group-based. In individualistic societies, people are trained from childhood to be independent, and each person assumes individual responsibility for success or failure.
3. Neutral vs. affective: the range of feelings outwardly expressed in the society. Are we free to express our emotions or are we restrained / controlled?
4.
Diffuse vs. specific: the types of involvement people have with each other ranging from all aspects of life to specific components.
5.
Achievement vs. ascription: the assignment of status in the society bases on performance (e.g., college graduation: vs. assignment based on heritage, gender, age, or social class).
Two dimensions deal with how a culture manages time and how it deals with nature

6. Past, present and future, or a mixture: the orientation of the society to the past, present, or future or some combination of the three. Do we do tasks in sequence or several tasks at once? Do we glorify the past, enjoy the moment, or plan for the future?
7. Control of vs. “accommodation with” nature: nature viewed as something to be controlled vs. something to be accepted. Beliefs regarding whether one controls one’s own fate.